Welcome to Innovate

Third Sector, Dumfries and Galloway works to promote, support and develop a strong Third Sector and specifically to develop enterprising Third Sector solutions to the many challenging issues that we face in the field of Adult Health and Social Care.

This website is aimed at those who are working in Adult Health and Social Care in the public sector. The policy agenda of integrating Health and Social Care services is to improve the quality and consistency of services for patients, carers, service users and their families. Health and Social Care workers in the public sector will be at the forefront of delivering the changes required to achieve this ambition.

social enterprise - power of partnershipsPutting You First has funded Third Sector, Dumfries and Galloway to deliver a project designed to support staff within Health and Social Care to develop a greater knowledge and understanding of social enterprise and enterprising third sector organisations and the role they could play in the future design and delivery of services to the people and communities of Dumfries and Galloway. The project aims to build on the success of the Putting You First Programme in bringing partners together and encouraging a culture that is supportive of new ways of working.

The first step in the project is to ask Health and Social Care workers from across Dumfries and Galloway to sign up and take part. When you sign up to the project you will receive regular updates on the project and case studies of Health and Social Care Social Enterprises from across the United Kingdom. You will also be registered to take part in two one day events which will take place at Easterbrook Hall on the 20th May and 16th September.

If you would like more information about the project please do not hesitate to contact me. Sharon Ogilvie Innovation Project Manager A: 16 Queensberry Street, Dumfries, DG1 1EX T: 0300 303 8558 (Option 1) E: Sharon@thirdsectordumgal.org.uk

Balancing the scales of Scotland’s health

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Susan Smith explores the role of community health initiatives in improving the quality of life of Scotland’s poorest

7th January 2015 by Susan Smith

Spartans Community Football Academy teaches children how to brush their teeth properly as well providing them with a safe place to play. Pilmeny Youth Group feeds kids fruit and healthy eating messages in partnership with Edinburgh Community Food, which also works with older people’s groups, young parents and other groups who need help learning how to cook and eat healthily.

This is just a fraction of the good work voluntary and community health initiatives provide in one small area of Scotland. These sorts of initiatives are doing practical work to break down health inequalities every day.

And according to MSPs, other approaches, such as public health campaigns like the Scottish Government’s Eat Better Feel Better campaign launching this week, do not help. Neither can the NHS provide the answer alone – by the time someone goes to their GP with symptoms that turn out to be Type 2 Diabetes, for example, it is already too late.

The problem is clear, poor people in Scotland continue to live considerably shorter lives blighted by far more ill health than the rest of society

The Scottish Government spent £12 billion on health and wellbeing in 2013/14, 35% of total public spending in Scotland. Yet projects like those mentioned above are struggling on a short-term shoestring of funding. With grants that last at best 12 months, underpaid staff spend far too much time filling in applications for the core costs needed to support their own jobs.

The health and sport committee report into health inequality provides much food for thought; not least that the committee has decided further investigation is unnecessary. The problem is clear, poor people in Scotland continue to live considerably shorter lives blighted by far more ill health than the rest of society.

These people don’t want to be told what to do by their GP or out of touch public health campaigns – a key message of the Eat Better Feel Better campaign, for example, is to get “behind the mums of Scotland to support them to make sure they buy and cook healthier food for their families”.

People living in Scotland’s poorest communities, however, do want to live as long and healthily as everyone else. Investing more in the projects that exist on the streets they live in and ensuring a healthy lifestyle is affordable to everyone is how to fix this problem.
(Taken from: Third Force News, 09/01/15)

 

 

Talking Mats

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Talking Mats Limited

Talking Mats Limited is an award winning social enterprise with a vision to improve the lives of people with communication difficulties by increasing their ability to communicate with the world around them about things that are important to them.

How it works?

Talking Mats is an interactive resource that uses three sets of picture communication symbols – topics, options and a visual scale – and a space on which to display them. This can either be a physical, textured mat, or a digital space, for example a tablet, smart board or computer screen for which we have created one of the best apps for communication disability.

Talking Mats is used by clinical practitioners, carers and support workers to support individuals with communication difficulties in a wide range of health, social work, residential and educational settings.

The following bullet points exemplify the ways in which Talking Mats can be used:

  • Help children and adults to express their preferences or feelings
  • Provide a ‘thinking tool’ to enable people to explore issues and help them to structure and verbalise their thoughts
  • Some people e.g people with a learning disability or who have had stroke and or dementia may have difficulties understanding information and understanding the different components of a given decision ,The visual presentation of Talking Mats helps people understand and reflect on information thus supporting their comprehension as well as providing an effective way for people to express their views
  • The structured and consistent format of Talking Mats makes it easier both for people with dementia to keep to topic and for the listener to follow the track of the conversation
  • Support people with communication difficulties to express negative as well as positive views and reduce the tendency for people to acquiesce, i.e., agree with everything
  • The act of physically moving the picture symbols helps people to organise their thoughts in a logical way

Why does Talking Mats work?

There are a number of reasons why Talking Mats is effective at helping people express their thoughts. their clinical, research and training experience provides evidence that Talking Mats helps people express their views because it:

Supports comprehension by:

  • Focusing on the essential words and omitting non-essential language
  • Giving information in multiple channels – visual, auditory and tactile
  • Helping people process concepts by breaking information down into small, manageable chunks
  • Reducing memory demands
  • Reducing distractibility
  • Allowing the client time to process information and respond in their own time

Improves quality of information by:

  • Giving control to the person being interviewed
  • Providing a structured framework for open questions
  • Avoiding direct confrontation
  • Giving people time
  • Helping people to say “no”

Can be personalised by:

  • Providing motivating and relevant topics
  • Being used in a relaxed way to get to know someone
  • Being used across a range of ages and abilities
  • Not requiring literacy
  • Augmenting existing communication systems

Business Structure

Talking Mats is a social enterprise and a limited company and is made up of a team of eight staff, five of whom are Speech and Language Therapists. Between them they cover all the key specialities of dementia, learning disability, aphasia, children with additional support needs Their awards have included : being one of first winners of the Scottish Enterprise Edge awards in 2013; the best start up Scottish Social Enterprise 2012 and the Advancing Healthcare Awards 2010.

Community Benefits

  • Talking Mats provides a resource that allows people with communication difficulties to be able to communicate better and feel more involved.
  • They deliver cross sector training
  • They carry out wide ranging research into communication disability
  • They offer a consultancy service for project development

Benefits to Partners

Talking Mats are used within Education, Health, Social Work and Residential Care settings to support communication and enhance participation. E.g.

  • Working with dentists – providing bespoke symbols
  • Working with Best Interest assessors – development of bespoke Best Interest symbols
  • Working with housing associations – providing a bespoke symbol set
  • Co-production with people with dementia – evaluation of dementia services for Social Services Department
  • Joint work with an Adult Survivor Project and Survivor Scotland to develop Talking Mats re disclosure – Keeping Safe
  • Joint child protection training with police, social work and education in two council areas
  • Liaison with child protection lead to develop GIRFEC resources

http://www.talkingmats.com/

 

 

 

Innovative Social Workers

The Calderdale social workers, many of whom were newly qualified, asked to split off from their council and be allowed to set up a practice outside of the local authority so they could have more freedom to innovate and reduce bureaucracy.

Their aim is to reduce the number of people going through formal community care assessments by providing less formal help at an earlier stage. Social workers will be based in a “shop front” office in the centre of Halifax.

For more information on this innovative idea see the link: http://www.communitycare.co.uk/2015/05/18/social-workers-break-away-council-innovate/

Make Your Social Enterprise Heard!

The Scottish Social Enterprise Census is an official count supported by the Scottish Government, Highlands and Islands Enterprise, Scottish Enterprise, Big Lottery Fund, and all of the main agencies that promote social enterprise in Scotland.

If you can answer ‘yes’ to the following questions we want to hear from you:

  • Is your organisation trading for the benefit of others (i.e. contracts, selling goods, customer pays a charity or social enterprise to deliver a product or service)?
  • Does your organisation have social or environmental goals?
  • Are you operating independently of the public sector?
  • Are you earning some level of income from delivering contracts or selling goods/services?
  • Do you aspire to greater financial independence through earned income (not simply reliant on grants)?
  • Do you reinvest your profits and retain assets entirely in pursuit of your social or environmental goals?

 

Please take 15 minutes today to register your organisation and submit some up-to-date information. It’s best if you complete the online form in one go and have relevant organisational and financial information at hand or in your head. Here is a link to the Social Enterprise Census where information can be entered online. We know of 52 established social enterprises in Dumfries and Galloway, please make sure that your Social Enterprise is recognised. Closing date is 29th May 2015.

As a thank you for registering The Social Value Lab would love to enter you for a FREE PRIZE DRAW to win an iPad Air and a selection of great weekly prizes from leading social enterprises.

Having problems or don’t like submitting your information online? Just contact Martin (martin@socialvaluelab.org.uk or 0141 530 1479) and he’ll make sure the process is as quick and painless as possible. Or you can contact Sharon Ogilvie (details below) and she can go through the form with you.

Most social enterprises and enterprising charities will be taking the opportunity to register information and views – so do your bit to ensure that the full contribution of the sector and its needs are recognised.

Contact details: Sharon Ogilvie Email: sharon@thirdsectordumgal.org.uk  tel: 0300 303 8558

Enterprising Third Sector Solutions

Third Sector, Dumfries and Galloway works to promote, support and develop a strong Third Sector and specifically to develop enterprising Third Sector solutions to the many challenging issues that we face in the field of Adult Health and Social Care.

 

Putting You First has funded Third Sector, Dumfries and Galloway to deliver a project designed to support staff within Health and Social Care to develop a greater knowledge and understanding of social enterprise and enterprising third sector organisations and the role they could play in the future design and delivery of services to the people and communities of Dumfries and Galloway.

The project aims to build on the success of the Putting You First Programme in bringing partners together and encouraging a culture that is supportive of new ways of working.

 

Further information on this project will be regularly posted on www.innov3te.org.uk including details of site visits to Wellbeing Enterprises and McSence. Case studies will also be added providing examples of social enterprises working in health and social care, such-as NAViGO Community Interest Company, a not for profit social enterprise that emerged from the NHS, to run all local mental health and associated services in North East Lincolnshire.

The knowledge collected during this project will be used to create a supportive culture amongst our partners in the Statutory Sector for new ways of working and build confidence that social enterprises and enterprising third sector solutions can be efficient and effective and capable of delivering quality service outcomes.

If you would like more information about the project please contact:

Sharon Ogilvie

Innovation Project Manager

A: 16 Queensberry Street, Dumfries, DG1 1EX

T: 0300 303 8558 (Option 1)

E: sharon@thirdsectordumgal.org.uk

Investing in Your Community

Community shares are an ideal way for communities to invest in enterprises serving a community purpose. This type of investment has been used to finance shops, pubs, community buildings, renewable energy initiatives, local food schemes, along with a host of other community based ventures in over 200 enterprises across the UK.

More than 40,000 people have already invested in this way, from as little as £50, but have raised amounts from £200,000 to £1.5million. What links them all is they are responding to a community need. All community enterprises need risk capital to start, to grow, and to be sustainable. The risk finance has to come from somewhere, and community shares enables this investment to come from the very community which an enterprise intends to benefit.

These community shareholders invest in local enterprises to provide goods and services to meet local needs and only expect a fair and modest return on their investment. At the heart of a community share offer is a strong business plan demonstrating that the venture is viable, profitable and sustainable. Also an offer document that details how the money raised will be used.

The term “community shares” refers to withdrawable share capital; a form of share capital unique to co-operative and community benefit society legislation. The primary motivation for investing in community shares is to support the community purpose of the enterprise; any financial benefits are secondary to this purpose.

To find out more contact Sharon Ogilvie at Third Sector Dumfries and Galloway or visit www.communitysharesscotland.org.uk. This site has an online handbook with a search facility to allow easy navigation through the document. The Plunkett Foundation have also produced a 36 page ehandbook primarily for Community Benefit Societies, here is the link: http://communitysharesscotland.org.uk/sites/default/files/resources/plunkett_community_shares_ebook.pdf

Register to take part

RegisterNow

To register to take part in the project please click here to enter your contact details and complete the baseline survey. You will be automatically enrolled onto the two events at Easterbrook Hall on the 20th May and 16th September.

You will be contacted by your line manager and provided with further information about the study visits in due course.

Vanguard of a new wave of responsible business

Nine support bodies, including Senscot and Social Enterprise Scotland, produce a document outlining the role social enterprise should play in Scotland.

Social enterprise should be at the vanguard of a new wave of responsible business in Scotland and become central to the “Scottish approach” to doing business, according to a new paper from nine social enterprise support bodies in Scotland.

Building a New Economy: Scotland’s Vision for Social Enterprise 2025 was published at the end of last month by organisations including SenscotSocial Enterprise ScotlandInspirAlba and Hisez.

The underpinning premise of the document is that Scotland has a long history of pioneering new forms of business, including mutuals, cooperatives and social enterprises. “These reflect a belief among the people of Scotland in a fairer, more equal society, organised for the benefit of all, where business activity is used as a means to this end and not an end in itself”.

The Paper goes on to urge the third sector in Scotland to build a social enterprise movement, capability and markets, and build on the potential of existing human and physical assets; greater adoption of the existing voluntary code of practice for social enterprises; a  commitment to a “national conversation” about social enterprise and increased awareness of social enterprise.

The paper argues that that building capability will require the development of specialist and generic business support, a more mature social finance market and stronger leadership in social enterprises. It says building markets requires a more recognisable consumer brand for social enterprise and greater obligation on the public sector to involve social enterprises in the co-design and testing of services. Building on potential will involve engagement with every school in Scotland, tax incentives and greater investment in skills, it says.

The document says that social enterprise should be a “broad church bound by a common code and principles”. Its vision, it says, is that “social enterprise will become more visible everywhere, making a widespread and positive impact. It will become central to the ‘Scottish approach’ to doing business and form a key part of the country’s international reputation in business and politics.”

David Coulter, Chief Executive of Third Sector Dumfries and Galloway welcomed the broad thrust of the paper saying “the third sector in all its forms needs to become more enterprising and in doing so set a course for social enterprise to play a key role in the Scottish economy”.